Snippets tagged html

  • Web Crawler

    This snippet features an F# Web crawler that i'm already using in 2 applications (slightly modified). It's based on a scalable network of communicating agents that follow URLs extracted from HTML pages until reaching the specified limit.

    22 people like this

    Posted: 6 years ago by Taha Hachana

  • Send HTTP POST request

    The snippet shows how to send HTTP POST request to a web page and download the generated HTML result. The POST data is encoded as a byte array and written to the request stream of HttpWebRequest.

    7 people like this

    Posted: 5 years ago by Tomas Petricek

  • Speech Stackoverflow article automatically

    This snippet automatically speeches text of question,answers and comments in a Stackoverflow article. It requires HtmlAgilityPack(available from Nuget package manager).(Attention: You need reset F# interactive to stop the speech)

    5 people like this

    Posted: 4 years ago by nagat01

  • Extract script blocks from html page

    This module extracts all the blocks out of an html page's header. This can be useful if you are writing tools to merge all the js for future minifaction, or for otherwise manipulating the files.

    4 people like this

    Posted: 3 years ago by devshorts

  • Html dsl starters

    following http://vimeo.com/groups/97577/videos/97315970 to make my own html DSL

    1 people like this

    Posted: 2 years ago by Brandon Dimperio (@MaslowJax)

  • Chart NuGet package downloads

    Quick script using FsLab that visualizes the aggregate number of downloads of a NuGet package over time, using the HTML type provider to get the data from www.nuget.org.

    2 people like this

    Posted: 1 years ago by Tomas Petricek

  • Strip HTML tags from a string

    Shows a recursive means of filtering out simple HTML tags from a string. This is ultimately a simple FSM with state transitions implemented by recursive invocations and a bool flag (in this simple case).

    0 people like this

    Posted: 8 months ago by Hugh Gleaves